FOX DPx2 - setup guide

BASICS

Here are a few basics about sag and the parameters that determine the air pressure you need.

  • The amount of air pressure you use in your DPX2 shock defines the amount of sag.

  • Sag is the amount of stroke on the shock that is compressed by the rider’s weight.

  • More air pressure will result in less sag.

 

 

DEFINING THE AIR PRESSURE

Defining the air pressure that fits you, depends on a few factors.

  • The air pressure depends on the design of the suspension. The same rider will need different air pressure on different bikes. You cannot simply transfer the air pressure from bike A to bike B.

  • The air pressure mainly depends on the rider’s weight. The weight should include all gear you wear.

  • Your riding style also influences the air pressure that fits you best. Adding air pressure will result in less sag, which means:

    • You will effectively use less travel

    • The geometry of the bike will be a bit more ‘up-right’, with a little higher BB

    • The chance to bottom out is smaller

  • Reducing the air pressure will result in more sag, which means:

    • You will effectively use more travel

    • The geometry of the bike will be a bit more ‘slack’, with a little lower BB

    • The chance to bottom out is bigger

 

The compression damping and the rebound damping are also very important in setting up the shock correctly. If for example you are a racer and have a very aggressive/ efficient riding style, you might want to go up in air pressure, but you can also play with the compression.

               

Setting up the right amount of air pressure works best with measuring sag, but here is a list of estimated pressure-values as a starting point. This table also shows the basic setting for the rebound and the low-speed-compression. The number of clicks is counted from fully closed.

Rider's weight (KG)

63

70

77

84

91

98

105

Air pressure (psi)

190

210

230

250

270

295

315

LSC

Rebound